Scoop Carpool App Does the Job

by Steve Schaefer

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Driving an electric car saves burning gas. But sharing a car takes one or more vehicles off the road entirely! So, with Scoop, convenience meets climate-consciousness with one easy-to-use app.

Scoop is a casual carpooling app that you can download onto your phone in a minute. Much as you might call Uber or Lyft to get a ride somewhere, with Scoop you can join a carpool, saving (or earning) money and doing something good for the environment at the same time.

I needed a ride home from work today, because I had driven a test car in and had returned it. So, I decided to try the Scoop app. My friend at work told me how well it had worked for her, but I normally drive test vehicles or my own Chevrolet Bolt EV. But today, the golden opportunity presented itself.

I had already downloaded the app, so Scooop knew where I worked and my home address. Since my signup, I received daily invites to set up a morning or afternoon ride. After a few days, they stepped it up to say a particular person was looking for a ride or a rider. Interesting way to get you to engage.

This morning, knowing I was ready, I touched the app icon on my phone, and it opened up. First, I had to indicate whether I needed a ride or wanted to provide one. Then, I needed to specify the time. Scoop suggests you make it as big a window as possible, so you have the best chance of attracting a driver who can get to you in time. I set up for 4:40 – 5:10 p.m.–a half hour.

Then, it asked me for credit card information, so they could easily bill (or credit) my account. That was no problem.

You need to sign up for morning commutes by 9 p.m. the evening before, and afternoon rides by 3 p.m. I signed up at 9:54 this morning for this afternoon and waited to hear.

At precisely 2 p.m. I received a notification that I was scheduled for an afternoon trip and had to let them know by 3 if I wanted to cancel. That was a good sign. But a little after 3 p.m., I got a text saying I hadn’t been assigned a carpool, but they would add me to the Shortlist, and they had notified drivers of my availability and would notify me by 4:40. Hmmm. This might leave me without a way home–or mean I’d have to call Lyft and pay big bucks.

But–shortly after, I got the word–I had a ride! Lawrence, who works at a company a few miles away, would come pick me up in his blue BMW at 5:10 p.m.. Great!

I got down to the front of my building just after 5 and waited around. I checked the app, clicking on “Details,” and it showed a little car representing Lawrence in front of his office building.

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The time counted down from 10 minutes to 5 minutes to 1 minute, and then it said “Trip Underway.” However, it really wasn’t because Lawrence’s car hadn’t moved. I waited a little longer, and began to wonder when I’d get home.

Then, my phone rang. Lawrence had been tied up in a meeting and was on his way. And he did appear about 20 minutes later. I was able to track his car as it made its way along, like the Lyft app. Here it’s halfway there.

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The Scoop app has buttons for phone or texting, so I could have reached out to Lawrence if I needed to, but as a first-timer, I was just watching to see how it worked.

I was Lawrence’s only rider, and slipped into the front passenger seat, stashing my briefcase in the back seat, along with his.

Turns out my driver was a friendly 32-year-old man working in the real estate division of his company. We had a very pleasant discussion about our jobs, outside interests, the rising price of housing in the Bay Area, and it seemed that before I knew it, we were pulling up in front of my house. It was a very pleasant experience.

Normally, the ride would cost $7.00–which doesn’t seem like much. I believe that I had one free credit for signing up, so it may have been a free ride.

A little later, I received a brief survey, which I filled out on my phone. I recommended Lawrence and then made him a favorite, so perhaps we’ll meet again. I normally drive, but I might try taking people with me. The money would be nice, but the best part is that I’d be taking people out of their own (likely gasoline) vehicles, and would have a chance to make some new friends in the process.

Scoop was founded by Jon and Rob Sadow in 2015. Their goal was to bring commuters together in carpools they love, since “80% of Americans drive alone to work, wasting valuable minutes every morning.” Their long, scrolling page of smiling (youthful) employees on their website includes 10 dogs, such as this one.

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Now, you can carpool without any hassle, anytime you want. If you ride, you pay a little, and if you drive, you earn a little. It’s easy.

 

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