My Chevy Bolt EV is Finally Here!

IMG_7467.JPG

I ordered my Bolt EV on October 11, 2016. Today, January 8, 2017, I picked it up and drove it home in the rain. A little water wasn’t going to stop me from getting my blue baby.

Sometimes, when you get something you’ve been waiting for, there’s a letdown, but today things went fine and turned out exactly as I hoped they would. And thanks to Don Mays and the folks at Boardwalk Chevrolet in Redwood City, it was painless, too, although I was there for over three hours.

It’s a funny story, really. On Friday, I took my 1993 Plymouth van to the junkyard to be crushed for California’s old gas car buyback program. You can read about it here. On the way home, I got a call from Don, my Chevy salesman, letting me know that he wasn’t exactly sure when the Bolt would land at the dealership–but it would be soon. I had been hoping that by finally getting rid of my ancient ride, I’d clear cosmic space in the universe for the Bolt. And–it turned out I was right. At around 4 p.m. Friday I got the call. The truck carrying my car had just arrived (it’s one of those blue ones).

img_7445

I knew that Sunday was going to be stormy, but we got up and waited for the phone call. At 11:12 a.m., just after the dealership opened, Don called and said my car was ready for pickup. So off we went–my wife kindly offered to drive me over.

When we arrived, we saw two Kinetic Blue Bolts in front. I checked the window sticker and identified mine. It was on the charger. Apparently, when they brought it over from the service area it had just 90 miles on the battery–not full–but it gathered some more while it sat there waiting for us.

Of course, there’s paperwork to do when you lease a car, but it was easy enough. Interestingly, they ask you to sign an agreement regarding whether to mount a front license plate bracket or not. Apparently this is a big deal to Corvette buyers (who don’t want the holes drilled). I personally expect to wear my plates like the law requires, so I just said, “sure.”

img_7470

The lease process was straightforward. They give you a $2,500 “lease cash” payment, and then take off the Federal $7,500 off the lease price (since I’m not the buyer). You can request what you want the monthly payment to be and how much you want to put down to get it. As it turns out, I had planned to put down a substantial cash amount to lower the monthly payment. I ended up giving them $9,000 ($10,000 minus my $1,000 deposit) and ended up with a $335 a month payment, including taxes. Of course, there’s no January payment–it’s included. I’ll be receiving a $2,500 rebate from the State of California (eventually), and I’m getting $1,000 from junking the van, so it’s not as bad as it sounds.

Don brought my dripping wet car into the dealership so we could get pictures (like the one at the top). The car was nicely prepped–shiny and clean. The interior was spotless and with just 3 miles on the odometer. There were even a few pieces of protective plastic still on the door handles. I’ve smelled a lot of new cars as a journalist, but this is the “freshest” of them all so far.

I’m glad I chose the lighter interior. All cars receive the white band across the dash and onto the doors, and white console trim, but mine is light gray on the doors and light gray and white on the leather seats, so it feels bright and airy in there. The other choice is dark gray and light gray. Here’s a cool design element–at night, a blue line outlines the lower dash.

New cars have a lot of electronics in them, and EVs especially require some explanation. I sat in the car while Don showed me some features. While he installed my temporary registration and removed my window sticker, I set up my OnStar account–a GM benefit for safety and turn-by-turn directions, among other things. The SiriusXM radio came right on, as you’d expect.

The Bolt EV has bright, colorful displays in the instrument panel and dash center, so it’s easy to know what’s going on. They put on a little video celebration when you first touch the glowing Start button. Then, the screens appear. They are certainly more interesting to look at than the Ford Sync3 system, which works fine but is more of a monochrome blue. The instrument panel has a large digital speedometer, and the slim typeface is quite stylish.

The steering wheel has some controls on the back, like Chrysler/Fiat products, with volume on the right. You can select audio presets on the left side of the wheel. The front of the right side of the wheel has a set of arrows to make selections from a complex menu of inforation and settings, too.

The back of the left side of the steering wheel contains a paddle to initiate regenerative braking–kind of like putting your foot on the brake. This can add to your range and give your foot a rest.

When the lease process was done, I pulled away, and everything felt right. I cruised along the freeway and through the city of Hayward on my way home. I then took my new car on a couple of errands around town. Nobody noticed it, as far as I can tell, but it was dark and rainy out there.

So, my new Bolt EV is finally parked in my driveway, and my adventure has begun. Stay tuned.

img_7475

 

 

Advertisements

Chevy Bolt Anticipation

img_6908It’s two days before Christmas (and one before the first night of Chanukah). Anticipation is in the air. But I’ve been in a state of anticipation since October 11, when I ordered my Chevrolet Bolt.

As an auto writer, I’m always driving someone else’s car for an article, but I decided that this car is the one I want for me. I think it will be ideal for my needs–even if I’m only spending part of my time driving it.

What I’m trying to learn now is patience. It’s one thing to walk into a dealership, stroll around the lot, find a car you like, and then sit down and negotiate to drive it home. It’s another thing to order a car you’ve never actually seen or even driven and wait. You hope it’ll be as good as you’ve heard.

I did manage to get down to the San Francisco Auto Show in November and see a Bolt (see photo above). It was, amazingly, the same color I ordered, and I walked around it, talked with people about it, sat in it, got out, sat in it again, and hovered around it for a while.

I also visited a dealership and drove one. I was pleased that the experience behind the wheel (and in the back seat) was as good as I’d hoped. Having the car win awards right out of the chute was encouraging, too, making me feel like I was making the right choice.

The ordering process itself was simple. I went into the dealership and specified what I wanted–color, features, etc. Then, I waited to hear that the order was submitted. Then, I waited to be informed that the factory had received it. After that, it took a while to find out that the factory was preparing to build the car. Then, I learned that it was built but awaiting transport.

Today, I found out that my Bolt is on its way to California on a train. When it arrives here, it’ll go to a distribution center to be checked out before being trucked over the dealership. When it’ll arrive at Boardwalk Chevrolet in Redwood City is uncertain, but my great salesman emailed me today he may be able to track the progress of the train. That should be interesting.

I wish they could show you your car being built at the factory. I wish they put a little camera with a homing device on it, so you could follow its progress. We’re used to tracking our Amazon purchases from the moment it’s shipped to the minute it lands on your doorstep, so what do you say, Chevy?

Am I being obsessive? I still have a schedule of test cars into the middle of January, and am not giving up my column. But this is only the third time I’ve ordered a car–the second one for my own use–and it’s taking longer than I thought.

It’s definitely a team sport. The Chevy Bolt EV Owners Group on Facebook is approaching 1,000 members. I expect not every single person in that group will sign a purchase agreement or lease, but there’s a real groundswell of interest. As a journalist, I’m hoping to put a real public face on this car, and I plan to take it as far as it’ll go.

A few days ago, I ordered my home charger from ChargePoint. I’ll get it installed and ready for when I need it. I’m hoping to open up some space in my garage during the holiday break, but I’m getting a long enough cord that it’ll reach outside too, if necessary.

Meanwhile, on Sunday, my family will open gifts, and we’ll have a great time together. But my real gift is still on its way. The exquisite pain of waiting makes it all the more exciting.