Chevy Bolt EV Easily Makes a 165-Mile Trip

Not long ago, owning an EV meant you were strictly limited on how far afield you could roam. The typical 70 to 80 miles per charge was a real issue.

That’s why, when I heard the Chevrolet Bolt EV had an EPA range of 238 miles, I knew it was the only choice for me. I couldn’t afford a Tesla, but really needed decent range.

I have a particular reason–my granddaughters live about 80 miles away and I wanted to be able to go visit them in my new car without stopping to charge. So yesterday, nearly three weeks after taking delivery, I made the 165.6-mile round trip.

My driving experience since getting my Bolt EV gave me confidence that I could do it. The driving range display gives estimated range, with “Max” and “Min” brackets above and below it, and the estimate appeared to be close to my actual mileage. But you never know until you try.

I filled my battery up on the Level 2 ChargePoint charger at work on Friday, and topped it off with my little 120-volt charger at home on Friday night. On Saturday, just before we left, the display looked like this:

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Note: That 203-mile figure is with the climate control on. With it off, the number would be about 10 miles higher.

We headed north and plugged in my wife’s iPhone to use Apple CarPlay to enjoy the James Taylor Greatest Hits album No. 1. It provided a soothing experience for a projected hour and a half on the road. I limited myself to 65 mph on the mostly freeway trip. I used the cruise control part of the time, and drove in Low, too. Low, with its greater brake regeneration, adds about 5 percent to the total.

We encountered some traffic in the MacArthur Maze in Oakland and around Petaluma (as usual), and inched along for a little while. Those two sections of the trip regenerated more energy than flying along unobstructed, and made the trip take a little longer. But I was encouraged that as we made progress, the projected range was staying higher than I expected it would.

After we pulled up in front of my son and daughter-in-law’s house, I examined the gauge:

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At an hour and a half, we had driven 82.8 miles, but the range indicator only moved from 203 to 144–or 59 miles. We had nearly three quarters of the battery charge left. That was fantastic!

We spent about four and a half hours with the family, and after a pleasant meal and much animated conversation and some hugs, we climbed back into the Bolt EV and headed home. I wasn’t worried about running out of charge on the way home.

This time, it was later, and traffic flowed steadily at 65 mph the whole way. That meant less opportunity to regenerate electricity, and we took more of a hit in the range. The final screen looked like this (darker because it was nighttime when we arrived home).

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This time, the 82.8 miles reduced the range by 91 miles–about 50 percent more than the trip up there–but not that far off from the actual traveled distance. We had less recharging ability, but saved a quarter of an hour of road time. 53 miles was a fine cushion. Our 165-mile trip showed up as 150 miles of range used. The Bolt EV passed my test.

The silence of the motor and smooth ride made our trip pleasant, the upgraded Bose stereo and Apple CarPlay kept us entertained, and I now know my Bolt EV will do the job!

 

Electric Fiat 500e- a Smooth Operator

Now nearly four weeks in to my electric car adventure with  Fidelio, the blue Fiat 500e, I’m really enjoying the smooth, powerful performance I get from him. Whether I’m zipping around town, accelerating onto the freeway, or climbing up the significant hills in my neighborhood, the little electric motor is more than up to the task.

Fascinating also is the way I can actually gain charge on a trip. Yesterday, I drove about four miles into Hayward, the next town over. The trip being mostly downhill or level, I ended up with a net range gain. I started with 46  on the range indicator and pulled into my destination with 51! Of course, I gave it back on the way home, but that’s the kind of numbers game you play when you’re driving an electric car today.

I keep coming back to the smooth, quiet experience I have every day commuting 18 miles each  way to work. I think the reason is that electric motors are much quieter, because they are so much simpler than gas engines. With just one moving part, the shaft, an electric motor creates virtually no vibration.The pistons of a gas engine move up and down, turning the crankshaft, which generates a lot of vibration and noise. That’s why there are engine mounts and mufflers. But you won’t find them in an electric car.

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I’ll admit that with its shroud, wearing the same dot pattern you’ll find on the front, sides, and back of the 500e, you can’t see much in this photo, but notice that there’s no fan or radiator here!

I found a nice little comparison online that explains the differences between electric motors and gas engines, in brief. It also shows why electric cars are cheaper to operate and require much less maintenance. The real issue remains the range and charging time, and I believe that will be mitigated in the near future, with better batteries and quick charging.

The bottom line for today, though, is to plan, so you have enough charge available. Your car sits most of the time anyway, so just be sure it’s plugged in! According to the dash readout in Fidelio, recharging from yesterday’s jaunts was going to take about 11 hours using household 120 current. So what? I was in my house hanging out and sleeping.